Real Haunted Houses

Real Haunted House

Mooney’s Mansion

Columbus, Ohio

During the 1950s, a couple lived in this mansion until the husband axed his wife to death and buried her in the woods surrounding the house. The statue of the woman that the husband had erected as a wedding gift when the two first married now appears to bleed–due to the ax wounds. The husband’s ghost is said to inhabit the upstairs bedroom in which the murder took place.

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111 Comments

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Lisa says:

January 14, 2012, 12:27 am

I do believe this to be true. There is actual police records that state what happened at this house. The story I heard was that the dad was sycophantic and one night he got tried of hearing the voices in his head (that was said the voices were of his son and daughter saying, over and over again, “daddy did it, daddy did it”) so he got up out of bed got a rope and knife and dragged his wife out to the walkover bridge, that was in front of their house; hung her and cut the rope. He then went back into the house to find his children, that where hiding in the basement. He then shot them and ripped out some of the cinder block wall and buried them in it. He then shot himself. I have heard this story many of times from different people at different times. The first time I heard about this is on a daycare field trip. Pretty messed up uhh? My daycare teacher dare my classmate to go and knock on the door; he thought he was brave, until he got all the way up the hill to the steps leading to the front door and he peed his pants and came running back. All of us kids were screaming and pounding on the windows for him to come back. I have been there several more times; every time I go something happens! It is so very true!!

MALI says:

October 3, 2012, 10:52 pm

I have been there and it is real the statue is still there and ma dude that take pics snapped a pic cause we heard somthing and got a pic of the whole family in the trees watching us security lights came on wen i got to da porch and we took offf

gavin baker says:

January 3, 2013, 3:55 pm

my cousin is a proffesional ghost hunter and hunted wallhala Rd. it is real i havent seen it but I sure want me and my friend ghost and im 11 and my friend is 10

Mimie says:

January 14, 2014, 4:06 am

My big brother took me & 2 of my friends down walahala one night when I was about 15 or 16. We lived in Gahanna at the time but had been brought up out north off of Manchester. Once you get to that bridge you can just feel a change in the atmosphere. I had also heard the story that the man had hanged his wife and children from the bridge. It doesn’t matter the story, something definitely went on in and or around that mansion. We also went to the site of an old mental hospital off of Sunbury rd. It had just been torn down the night my friends, brother & I went there, but my brother & me had been there previously when it still stood and the pictures we were able to develop from being inside that hospital are unforgettable.

Rob says:

June 9, 2014, 4:17 pm

Always some dumb ***** that has to try and **** up a
Legend… Stfu and leave it be its real was there last night….

Jordan says:

January 21, 2015, 1:34 pm

LOL Mooneys Mansion. I grew up around there. As a kid -we all used to go there every winter to slide down the long hill. I never met the people living there but they were nice enough to let us play. We used to hang dummies over the bridge to freak people out. Yes there was a statue, and I have heard the legends.

kevin lee says:

January 27, 2015, 8:50 pm

I was born in that neighborhood in 1965 and we grew up hearing the scary tales of Mooney mansion.
in elementary school we all use to hang around under the bridge..we even had a rope swing in there for some time, we heard all the stories growing up & we used to sit under that bed staring up at the house talking about all the details, the only thing that we found strange was that we never saw anyone at the house but the grass was always cut.
but that probably just means that the homeowner cut the grass during the day instead of after school, even though we heard all the tales and had our cells all freaked out about it through my childhood we never saw anything going on up at the house, I suppose it would have been nice to at least see someone out in the yard once in a while but we never did and I was there until I was about 16 years old, so basically I probably spent at least 8 summers underneath that bridge playing with my friends,even the tail of the statue that was bleeding we could see the statue back in the day if I remember correctly, but we were always too scared to run up and take a look at it being children, I suppose it’s things like this in life that keep the excitement going when you are young, so in my case is always A good feeling about the scare we had as a child to keep excited as we were growing up…

Josh says:

July 19, 2015, 9:05 am

I was there not to long ago I tri to go 25mph Dwn and up the hill nd I suddenly hit 40mph then slowed down jus before hitting the street. But me nd my cousin tried to look for this mooney mansion or even this so called witches house but couldn’t find either one can someone help me

Kate says:

January 24, 2016, 6:52 am

I have had a really scary experience in Wallhalla with my friend Travis we were cruising down the road in neutral you know doing the ghost pushing the car legend when I spotted something strange I heard him make a hiiss sound like he was in pain than he floored the has we waited until we got home to talk about what we saw as I wanted to see if we had seen the same thing. We both drew a black dog with a long about red eyes and giant ears after looking it up it’s not the first time people have seen this

cindy says:

March 30, 2017, 9:09 am

I grew up not far from Wallhalla and explored the creeks there often as a child. i heard all of the tales about Mooney’s mansion. The most widely circulated tale at that time was that the butler was murdered and he was buried near the obelisk that was near the road. The story went that on a dark night, you could see the obelisk slowly turning. But one day my sister and I decided to go knock on the door and try to sell Mrs Mooney some girl scout cookies. She was a very nice old lady. Nothing creepy about it or her at all. She did buy some cookies. A few years later the house was on the market and my dad took us over there to look at the property. What a gorgeous old house. And there was also a really cool carriage house, if I remember correctly. glad to hear someone is living in that house now. It sure was a beauty.

James Rummel says:

August 31, 2017, 1:46 am

My name is James Rummel. I grew up on Clinton Heights Ave, which is only a few blocks from Mooney’s Mansion, as it was known at the time. I can’t count the times I walked my dogs down Walhalla Road, which is a narrow road at the bottom of a steep ravine. The area down inside the ravine is very heavily wooded, with a shallow creek running along the north side of the road. Clintonvile, the neighborhood where all of this is situated, has very well manicured lawns, with residents taking great pride in their property. I loved Walhalla Road because the woods meant I could walk my dogs every day down there and would never have to bother picking up after them.

A concrete bridge allows Calumet Street to pass over Walhalla Road, and if memory serves it is about 35 feet from the bottom of the ravine to the top of the bridge. Might not sound like much, but it was certainly impresive to my young eyes.

Mooney’s Mansion was at the top of the ravine on the south side, and it could be seen pretty well as there were some stone steps that led from the front door of the mansion all the way down to the shadow of the bridge. Back in the 1960’s, a concrete pedestal could be found about twenty feet to the east of the base of the stairs. It was about five feet tall, with the bust of a woman set on top. It was heavily overgrown with vines and other foliage, and it had crumbled somewhat in the weather. The last time I saw the pedestal was about 1974 or so, and someone had marked the face of the stone woman with orange spray paint. There were some that said it was a marker for the grave of Dr. Mooney’s murdered wife, but I really have no idea. It was gone the next time I bothered to look for it.

I did not have a happy childhood, and I had a habit of taking short cuts along alleys and back ways in order to avoid the bullies that plagued me. That was how I found the torso of a mannequin in a dumpster behind one of the shops along High Street. It was 1979, I was 15 years old, and as it was a few days before Halloween I took it home and hid it in the garage. On All Hallows Eve I snuck out of the house and hung the partial mannequin from the Calumet Street bridge so it dangled down into Walhalla Road, almost within spitting distance of the stairs leading from Mooney’s Mansion. I waited for someone to start telling tales of suicidal teens who ended their days with a rope, but was disappointed. Now that I have heard tales of how Dr. Mooney ended his life by hanging from the bridge, I suppose it just took a while for word to get around.

I live in Texas now, and it has been decades since I last walked down the deep and shaded Walhalla Road. It did leave a mark on my memories, though.

James

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